Thai Amulets – An Overview

A two-headed baby ‘zombie’ is the most terrifying thing you can buy in Bangkok’s riverside Buddhist amulet market, but if you promise to feed it every day, the undead spirit could become your loyal slave and protect you against misfortune.
Several magazines published in Thailand are devoted to news about amulets.
“In Thailand, the lowest level of believers buy these zombies and other amulets like this,” says Phramaha Watcharapung Kaviwungso, a saffron-robed Buddhist monk warily examining the grotesque doll-like totem.
“The next highest level of believers buy amulets which have the faces of Buddhist monks. The highest level of believers are people like me, who believe only in Buddha.”
Most Thais are Buddhists, but they also mix a bewildering slew of other beliefs — including Hindu, animist and superstitions — into their spiritual outlook.
Buddha was not into amulets, and advised followers to ignore such illusions. But today’s Thais surround themselves with as much protection as possible by wearing, carrying or keeping at home one or more small amulets.
An amulet for every occasion
According to believers, amulets can bring good luck, true love, wild sex, cold cash or exquisite relief from obscure personal problems.
This round amulet portrays Hinduism’s elephant-headed Lord Ganesh.
The pieces come in all styles and shapes, made of metal, wood, bone or plaster, and can include sacred ash from incense, colored dust from a temple’s bricks, human hair or other material.
Some portray Buddha, or a famous senior monk, in bas-relief. Others depict a mythical creature or cryptic script, often in Khmer language, which may be indecipherable.
Thailand is one of the world’s biggest producers, sellers and exporters of amulets, which are available in every Thai city and village. Some men, including tough guys in danger of being killed, wear a necklace of several big, heavy amulets in a pretentious form of Buddhist bling.
Antique or rare amulets can fetch more than 3.3 million baht. Most Thais, however, usually get their amulets at a Buddhist temple after making a small donation, or by rummaging among humble stalls where prices begin at five or 10 baht.
The stories explaining most amulets are often half-remembered, and can change depending upon who is describing the charm and its powers.
Invisibility and protection
The two-headed baby zombie sells for about 200 baht at Bert Bu’s shop, in Bangkok’s main amulet market near Phra Chan Road, next to Thammasat University, along the Chao Phraya River. It is made of ‘pressed powder,’ hardened to form the shape of Thailand’s legendary Khu Mon Tong.
According to some legends, Khu Mon Tong is a baby who died, perhaps stillborn. His loving father fed Khu Mon Tong’s corpse, and successfully reanimated its spirit, which gratefully protected the parent. Anyone who buys a Khu Mon Tong amulet and diligently feeds it a morsel of food every day, offers it toys and calls it “my son,” can hope to be protected from enemies.
Some Buddhist amulets can be sinister things. Fanatics have created Khu Mon Tong amulets by using the crushed skull of a baby, or with the dripping oil from a roasted infant.
A buyer uses a small magnifying glass to scrutinize an amulet.
A much more popular and peaceful amulet shows a faceless Buddha sitting cross-legged, atop a layered plinth.
The rectangular amulet, often called a ‘Phra Somdet,’ is easy to produce from a plaster-like substance, and is frequently given to devotees at Buddhist temples. On the reverse side, it may include the name of the temple, or the monk who manufactured it, or other information.
One version has a small fish bone embedded in the back, which some people believe bestows special powers, and costs a mere 10 baht. Another amulet is illustrated with a large ship, and is sometimes called a ‘Krom Ma Luang Chumporn.’ It is said to protect people during ocean voyages.
A chubby cross-legged man, covering his face with both hands, depicts a devout monk who resembled the Lord Buddha. People mistakenly worshipped him, thinking he was actually Buddha, until he hid his face so no one could see him, according to believers.
The amulet is called a ‘Phra Phid Ta,’ which translates as ‘monk closed eyes.’ Possess this amulet, and you will remain virtually invisible to your opponents, they say.
Just superstition? Wearers swear by their amulets
Professional collectors will whip out a tiny magnifying glass and scrutinize an amulet’s details to determine if it is genuine or one of the many forgeries offered to unsuspecting buyers. To create a bestseller, monks pray intensely over a batch of fresh amulets, and perform other acts to infuse the item with spiritual functions.
These dinner plate-sized icons show “Phra Pid Ta,” though most collectors buy smaller amulets that can be worn on a necklace.
Huge fortunes are made from selling amulets, prompting allegations of corrupt monks and temples raking in massive profits, which are unaccounted for and tax-free. Complaints are also frequently voiced about the blatant commercialization of Thai-style Buddhism — and its degeneration into mindless superstition — that tarnishes Buddha’s lofty ideals.
But believers swear that their favorite amulet saved their life during a car crash or violent attack. To boost morale, Thailand’s military has even handed out amulets to its Buddhist soldiers fighting in the south against Muslim separatists.
Thailand’s amulet bazaars include shops selling tiny plastic or glass containers — ringed by metal, silver or gold — to enshrine an amulet while wearing it on a necklace or storing it at home. Rules to obey while wearing an amulet include removing it during sexual intercourse and keeping it off the floor and away from people’s feet.
Thieves target temples, shops and homes if they think they can steal expensive amulets, creating an irony in which ‘protective amulets’ need protection. People who complain that their amulet failed, however, are usually told that it works only if the person who possesses it is a pious Buddhist, creating a marvelous loophole to avoid refunds.

A two-headed baby ‘zombie’ is the most terrifying thing you can buy in Bangkok’s riverside Buddhist amulet market, but if you promise to feed it every day, the undead spirit could become your loyal slave and protect you against misfortune.

Several magazines published in Thailand are devoted to news about amulets.”In Thailand, the lowest level of believers buy these zombies and other amulets like this,” says Phramaha Watcharapung Kaviwungso, a saffron-robed Buddhist monk warily examining the grotesque doll-like totem.
“The next highest level of believers buy amulets which have the faces of Buddhist monks. The highest level of believers are people like me, who believe only in Buddha.”
Most Thais are Buddhists, but they also mix a bewildering slew of other beliefs — including Hindu, animist and superstitions — into their spiritual outlook.
Buddha was not into amulets, and advised followers to ignore such illusions. But today’s Thais surround themselves with as much protection as possible by wearing, carrying or keeping at home one or more small amulets.An amulet for every occasion
According to believers, amulets can bring good luck, true love, wild sex, cold cash or exquisite relief from obscure personal problems.

This round amulet portrays Hinduism’s elephant-headed Lord Ganesh.The pieces come in all styles and shapes, made of metal, wood, bone or plaster, and can include sacred ash from incense, colored dust from a temple’s bricks, human hair or other material.
Some portray Buddha, or a famous senior monk, in bas-relief. Others depict a mythical creature or cryptic script, often in Khmer language, which may be indecipherable.
Thailand is one of the world’s biggest producers, sellers and exporters of amulets, which are available in every Thai city and village. Some men, including tough guys in danger of being killed, wear a necklace of several big, heavy amulets in a pretentious form of Buddhist bling.
Antique or rare amulets can fetch more than 3.3 million baht. Most Thais, however, usually get their amulets at a Buddhist temple after making a small donation, or by rummaging among humble stalls where prices begin at five or 10 baht.The stories explaining most amulets are often half-remembered, and can change depending upon who is describing the charm and its powers.
Invisibility and protection
The two-headed baby zombie sells for about 200 baht at Bert Bu’s shop, in Bangkok’s main amulet market near Phra Chan Road, next to Thammasat University, along the Chao Phraya River. It is made of ‘pressed powder,’ hardened to form the shape of Thailand’s legendary Khu Mon Tong.
According to some legends, Khu Mon Tong is a baby who died, perhaps stillborn. His loving father fed Khu Mon Tong’s corpse, and successfully reanimated its spirit, which gratefully protected the parent. Anyone who buys a Khu Mon Tong amulet and diligently feeds it a morsel of food every day, offers it toys and calls it “my son,” can hope to be protected from enemies.
Some Buddhist amulets can be sinister things. Fanatics have created Khu Mon Tong amulets by using the crushed skull of a baby, or with the dripping oil from a roasted infant.

A buyer uses a small magnifying glass to scrutinize an amulet.A much more popular and peaceful amulet shows a faceless Buddha sitting cross-legged, atop a layered plinth.
The rectangular amulet, often called a ‘Phra Somdet,’ is easy to produce from a plaster-like substance, and is frequently given to devotees at Buddhist temples. On the reverse side, it may include the name of the temple, or the monk who manufactured it, or other information.One version has a small fish bone embedded in the back, which some people believe bestows special powers, and costs a mere 10 baht. Another amulet is illustrated with a large ship, and is sometimes called a ‘Krom Ma Luang Chumporn.’ It is said to protect people during ocean voyages.
A chubby cross-legged man, covering his face with both hands, depicts a devout monk who resembled the Lord Buddha. People mistakenly worshipped him, thinking he was actually Buddha, until he hid his face so no one could see him, according to believers.
The amulet is called a ‘Phra Phid Ta,’ which translates as ‘monk closed eyes.’ Possess this amulet, and you will remain virtually invisible to your opponents, they say.
Just superstition? Wearers swear by their amulets
Professional collectors will whip out a tiny magnifying glass and scrutinize an amulet’s details to determine if it is genuine or one of the many forgeries offered to unsuspecting buyers. To create a bestseller, monks pray intensely over a batch of fresh amulets, and perform other acts to infuse the item with spiritual functions.

These dinner plate-sized icons show “Phra Pid Ta,” though most collectors buy smaller amulets that can be worn on a necklace.
Huge fortunes are made from selling amulets, prompting allegations of corrupt monks and temples raking in massive profits, which are unaccounted for and tax-free. Complaints are also frequently voiced about the blatant commercialization of Thai-style Buddhism — and its degeneration into mindless superstition — that tarnishes Buddha’s lofty ideals.
But believers swear that their favorite amulet saved their life during a car crash or violent attack. To boost morale, Thailand’s military has even handed out amulets to its Buddhist soldiers fighting in the south against Muslim separatists.
Thailand’s amulet bazaars include shops selling tiny plastic or glass containers — ringed by metal, silver or gold — to enshrine an amulet while wearing it on a necklace or storing it at home. Rules to obey while wearing an amulet include removing it during sexual intercourse and keeping it off the floor and away from people’s feet.
Thieves target temples, shops and homes if they think they can steal expensive amulets, creating an irony in which ‘protective amulets’ need protection. People who complain that their amulet failed, however, are usually told that it works only if the person who possesses it is a pious Buddhist, creating a marvelous loophole to avoid refunds.

New Phra Pidta Amulets!

A small very rare white jade Phra Pidta amulet from Wat Lahn Kuat Temple in Sisaket, and part of the WLK Collection.We have had these very rare Phra Pidta amulets in stock for over five years now. We just never put them up for sale, but today we found them again at the bottom of our pile of thousands of amulets, and we thought it was a good time for them!

See the Phra Pidta History >

See Our Phra Pidta WLK Collection (White Jade) – very rare (one-of-a-kind)

These amulets have some interesting history. At Wat Lahn Kuat in the very south of Sisaket province in the Northeast where I am from, they made this beautiful hand-carved white jade Buddha about 11 years ago. The block they started from was large, and exorbitant in price. This was a one-time purchase of the block of jade from the quarry. The abbot had blessed it, along with dozens of other monks in a long ceremony to ensure it was worthy as a representative of the white Buddha they’d soon be carving.

After they carved it, they put it in the Main bot where anyone can go see it. The place is full of a million bottles decorating the walls of all the buildings at the temple. It is quite a sight to see.

So, they had many kilograms of white jade pieces left after the big white Buddha was finished. They decided to create a number of smaller amulets for people to wear. These Phra Pidta amulets are directly from this block of white jade!

They made white jade Somdej Toh amulets. They made triangle shaped Somdej amulets. They made some rectangle Nong Kwak amulets, and then finally, they made these lovely little Phra Pidta amulets!

Phra Pidta is a representative of a monk who was meditating deep in the state of absorption called “Jhana.” Jhana is an experience where the mind is so relaxed, so peaceful and non-plussed, that it the regular five senses that we use everyday as we go through life – don’t function. The senses literally stop – so no sense-objects are created. There is pure watching with the mind, of what is going on inside – not outside the body.

Phra Pidta covers his eyes in the amulet figures because it is symbolizing being deep in Jhana and that the outside world is of no effect – of no consequence.

So, because this is seen as a sort of magical state – people came to believe that Phra Pidta amulets would be good for financial gain. And, that is how it has been. These amulets are the most recommended by monks when asked which amulets can bring back a person’s wealth, whether talking about business related wealth, or personal wealth. Some people even use this for lottery.

See Our Phra Pidta WLK Collection (White Jade) – very rare (one-of-a-kind)

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

New Styles – Thai Amulets, Necklaces, Bracelets!

We just returned from a big shopping trip and will have some new styles of Thailand amulets and necklaces and bracelets. This trip was to focus on getting more silver colored amulets in silver cases, white amulets in silver cases, and some unique shapes and styles of amulets we have never sold before. Stay tuned, we’re going to ramp up the design of our site and get rid of some old inventory as well as add new pages and new formatting to the site.

We bought over 300 amulets today, and we bought over 700 necklaces, and more than 900 bracelets. We have a lot of photos to take!

In addition we also spent a lot on some solid silver amulets we found that were really special. if you have an interest in some really lovely solid silver Buddha amulets for gifts for loved ones in stainless or solid silver cases – let us know and we’ll show you the pages as they go live at the blog here!

One thing in particular that we bought today that we’re extra excited about is a Buddha carved from a white stone. It is NOT ivory, we don’t ever sell that. It is not white jade. It is a stone that is lovely, and the detail on this little statue (6 inches high?) is really nice. We’ll be selling it here within a few days. Just need some good photos.

OK, make sure you come back and visit us in the next few days and weeks to see which new amulets are getting put up here. We typically put all amulet necklaces here first, and later add them to the main ThaiAmuletSales.com site. This is the ThaiAmuletSales.com/blog/ site. They are sister sites, and related, but not the same really. You can see the different formatting and information on each of them. The Thai Amulet Sales Blog is more updated for sure!

Ok, see you here in a day or so… :))

With Metta Friends!

Joy B

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

New Ganesh, Buddha, and Other Amulets on New Site

Very nice and unique oval gold Ganesh amulet wrapped in an ornate stainless steel case.

We just posted the nicest Ganesh (Ganesha) amulet we have ever had in our collection.

See it here: Premium Ganesh (SOLD OUT – SO SORRY!)

We have been silently adding some of our amulets to our new shopping cart system over at ThaiAmuletSales.com. Click one of the links on this page to see Thai amulets we have – some of which we have never published before. As we fill up these pages we’ll have all of our over 600 amulets at the shopping cart!

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

New Mobile Compliant Thai Amulet Shopping Website

New Thai amulet sales website screenshot.

We’ve been at work for the last couple of weeks on a new project that has been a long time in coming – a new ThaiAmuletSales website!

Finally we’ll be able to do many things with the website we couldn’t do before.

Like what?

Revisions to Our Thai Amulet Sales Website:

  • easy to add new Thai amulets, necklaces, and bracelets – ANY PRODUCTS!
  • customers can now shop by PayPal or Credit Card (AMEX, VISA, MASTERCARD) easier than ever
  • customers can easily request an invoice to pay with credit card or PayPal
  • customers can easily search for all products on the site by category, tag, item number, or name
  • customers can sort product lists easily based on price!
  • we can give coupon codes to customers to use during payment!
  • we can easily recommend other products you might like based on what you’ve already viewed
  • many new Thai amulets and necklaces added
  • bigger fonts and easier to read on desktop, tablet, and mobile devices
  • mobile ready for all devices – instantly transforms the format to display appropriately
  • cleaner code which makes it faster

Please be patient for a couple of weeks while we iron out the details of this major upgrade. There will be pages you cannot find, and images that don’t pop up. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us and let us know!

Thank you to our customers over the past seven years. It has been an amazing time, and we’ve been happy to serve so many people and help the world find Thai amulets and accessories!

With Metta!

Joy B. :)

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

 

High Resolution Thailand Amulet Images

Here are some of our amulets in plastic trays – so you can see that we really do have the amulets we sell. We know it’s hard to trust a company online – but, we’ve been selling amulets like these for over 4 years now and have had many satisfied customers. Won’t you be one too?

Thailand Amulets (click)– high resolution photos

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

All Thai Amulet Photos from Our Blog?

Here’s an easy way to see a lot of Thai amulets in one place. Blogger.com just updated their functionality to include a great graphics preview tool for all blogs. Just add /view/snapshot to the end of any blogger blog.

Here’s a preview of ours. Click the link below the image to see the full page with over 100 amulet photos in great color.

NOTE – please keep in mind this was years ago, and we do not have all of these amulets any longer, but we do have some. If you find one you like at the link below, let us know the description of it and where you found it – which URL – and we’ll let you know if we have one. :P

A preview of the hundreds of Thai amulets we have posted at ThaiBuddhaAmulets.blogger.com.
A preview of the hundreds of Thai amulets we have posted at ThaiBuddhaAmulets.blogger.com.

CLICK THIS BELOW to GO:
http://thaibuddhaamulets.blogspot.com/view/snapshot

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

Thailand Amulets

Thai Phra Pidta (Pid Ta) amulet from southern Thailand. Pid Ta is a Buddhist monk involved in deep meditation in the jhanas. Thais believe these amulets have connection to supernatural and are good for health and wealth.Here is an overview of the important Thailand amulets, as well as the state of amulet selling and buying in Thailand. We have a few different amulet sites, and, while we’re not world renowned experts on the amulets of Thailand – we have learned some things over these few years of selling them online and in our Thailand store.

How are Thai Amulets Worn?

Thai amulets are usually worn around the neck by Thais in Thailand. Some Thais wear one amulet, and some wear as many as 7 – one hanging down in the middle of the necklace, and 3 on each side. We rarely see any more than 7 amulets on one necklace, but we’re sure they are out there. Thais, as all Asians can be, are quite superstitious. Amulets arose out of this superstition. As such, there are amulets that came out of Animism – Thailand’s early religious roots, as well as Buddhism, Hinduism, and black magic type beliefs.

Some Thais hang their amulets from the mirror in their car. Some have shrines setup in their homes where they have dozens or hundreds of Thai amulets from every temple they’ve visited, and every Thai holiday they’ve ever witnessed at these shrines.

Thais believe that all amulets should be worn at head/chest level, and not kept in the pocket. Amulets should never be worn around the waist, legs, or feet – as this shows disrespect to the religion and the followers. In a similar way, images of the King of Thailand should never be worn near the feet.

What Historical Figures Are the Subject of Thai Amulets?

White detailed Phra Phrom amulet in a bright silver case. From Thailand Buddhist temple.Typical Thailand Buddhist amulets have figures such as: Buddha, Kwan Yin, and some famous monks like Luang Phor Tuad, Luang Phor Klai, Phra Bit Tar (Biddar) and others. Sometimes the Kings of Thailand (Rama 1-9) are featured. We even sell an amulet that has portraits of all 9 Thai kings on it. Thais do love their kings, and many amulets feature King Rama V, and IX – Thailand’s current king, King Bhumibol.

The Hindu influence on Buddhist amulets can be seen with Ganesh (Ganesha) – the elephant amulets, Shiva, and other gods and goddesses.

There are such colorful characters as Lersi, Tigers, Demons, Guman Thong, and others that give a wide-breadth of figures. There is an amulet for everyone, from child to an elderly Thai on his deathbed.

By far Buddha amulets are the most popular and the most worn amulet Thais purchase. I would say then, Luang Phor Tuad, Thailand’s most famous monk – has the 2nd most wearers in the country.

Where Do Thai Amulets Come From?

Keep in mind that Buddhist amulets found in Thailand are two things… one, a religious symbol to those that believe in Buddhism, and two, a money-making scheme for dishonest companies to take advantage of good Buddhist followers.

Brown Petrified Wood Somdej Toh Lotus Amulet 10 - WLK Collection
Item #SOMTOHLOTUS1 – Unblossomed Lotus Somdej Toh amulet. Approx. 3 – 4 cm high. From Wat Larn Kuat Temple in Sisaket, Thailand.

Amulets are sometimes given directly from monks. We have some amulets that were given to us over the years from monks (Phra) at our local Buddhist temples. These are not to be sold, and most Thais hold them in special esteem. If you visit Thailand and see a bit of the country, not just one area – you will find that some monks are into amulets as lucky, bringing health, fortune, or love, and some are not at all.

In fact, western monks like those found at Wat Pah Nanachat in Warin Chamrap, Thailand – Ubon province, do not have amulets at all. There are no amulets sold there at the temple, and they do not talk about special powers of amulets – choosing instead to focus on what Buddha said and did – as the way to reaching nibbana (nirvana).

Wat Suan Mokkh in Chaiya, Surat Thani province is another temple that does not even sell 1 amulet for visitors. Buddhadasa Bhikku, the first monk and founder of Wat Tum Sua didn’t believe in amulets as having any power at all, and frequently called them a product of superstitious minds. Buddha himself was not known to wear amulets.

Other monks are well-versed in the powers of amulets, and when they bless an amulet – it gains even greater power. Wat Tum Sua’s Ajarn Jumnien (Teacher Jumnien) is one such monk of Chinese lineage that is now often known as Thailand’s good luck monk. Aj. Jumnien wears dozens of amulets at a time, and is sought after for his blessing and amulets – which are known to be exceptionally powerful. Chinese people mostly, from China, Malaysia, and Singapore come from far away to see Abbot Jumnien and donate money for his temple in Krabi, Thailand.

Wat Tum Sua is our home temple, and where we get the majority of our amulets from. The temple is beautiful and well worth a stop if you happen to be in southern Thailand.

What Are Amulets Made Of?

Thailand amulets are typically made of hard materials like: iron, tin, brass, copper, bronze, silver, pewter, marble, jade, crystal (rarely), granite, petrified wood (very rarely), glass, wood, ceramic, clay, and other materials.

Fake versus Real Amulets

White Ganesh and gold Ganesh amulets from Southern Thailand.Amulets from Thailand are easy to replicate as fakes, and this is a giant business, not only in Thailand, but, across the globe as companies are formed to take advantage of well-meaning Buddhists that want to protect their families’ health, or ensure good karma.

It is not difficult to manufacture fake amulets, because the expensive amulets – the genuine amulets from many years ago, were made with simple technology and there are no real secrets any longer about which is a real or fake amulet. The experts cannot tell fake amulets from real in many cases.

In fact, recently some very expensive and rare amulets were judged to be fake at a conference of “experts” and later proven to be genuine amulets with great power. A collector bought them before the discovery – for very little money, and was rewarded with millions of Thai baht as a result.

We spent 2-hours yesterday looking at amulets that were being sold on eBay and we were appalled. Amulets that are found for $3 are selling for $150. Amulets that are no more than $10 to buy in Thailand in rip-off amulet stores – are selling on eBay for $250 and we even saw one for more than $400.

The state of the amulet industry is rather sad. How can someone from Canada, Australia, Tahiti, Spain, UK, or Czechoslovakia buy genuine amulets from real Buddhist temples?

Here at www.ThaiAmuletSales.com we wanted to come up with a way for Buddhists across the world to buy genuine Thai amulets from Thailand, without any chance of forgery or ill-intent. We came upon a simple solution.

We offer Thai Buddhist amulets only bought at the Buddhist temples in Thailand.

That’s it. We don’t buy from non-Buddhist sources.

You can be absolutely sure that the amulets you’re buying are genuine articles, crafted from Buddhist hands.

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

More Thai Buddha Amulet Inventory Coming – Photos

Here are some more photos of some new Buddha amulets we found and will put online at the main ThaiAmuletSales.com site in a couple days. If you are interested – write us and let us know which one you want before we put them up. We frequently sell amulets before they even have an order page finished for them. In fact, some of our amulets are sold out before we can even put them on the Thai Amulet Sales site.

Thai Buddha Photo Gallery Below:

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics

More Thai Buddha Amulets Added 7-4-11

We just added another 19 Thai Buddha amulets to the main (THAIAMULETSALES.com) site. Some of them we put at our New Buddha Amulets page, and others we’ll add later. We also have another 80 different amulets we’ll get online in the next few days.

If you get a chance, check it out. Here are some of the amulets we just made available:

Click one of the below Buddhist figures to learn more and find amulets:

The Buddha – Happy Buddha – Jinaraj Buddha – Somdej Buddha

Kwan Yin – Ganesh – Nong Kwak – Luang Phor Tuad 

Jatukam Ramathep –  Thai Black Magic – Buddha Relics